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TOPIC: Climbing Nun Kun Information Required

Re: Climbing Nun Kun Information Required 6 years, 6 months ago #963

Hi Guys ,

Thanks for sharing your views . I think all of us on the forum are very passionate mountaineers and have had our set of experience's and thus each one entitled to their own opinion .

Hope we continue to respect each other's views and keep contributing to the forum for everyone's benefit .
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Re: Climbing Nun Kun Information Required 6 years, 6 months ago #964

Hi Admin,
I get your point, but I can't say I agree with you completely (one of the posters does not come across as a passionate "mountaineer" yet, passionate perhaps). I feel Jerry_Pothen's straight talk is very useful, just the kind that is valuable and needed here (you will find tons of gyaan by Stok Kangri summitters on the net, and that is hardly rare or valuable). In the Himalayas as far as I know there are no good grading system for difficulty, like you have the French alpine grade system, or various rock or ice or mixed climbing grades. (Occasionally one sees alpine grades being applied to Himalayan mountains, but those only refer to the technical difficulty at the crux, and not hazards, cold, wind etc., the overall difficulty, which the French grades accomplish beautifully for the Alps). In the absence of such scales, one relies on information we gather on internet, such as this, to see what climbs are within reasonable challenge to us. Over-cautious goals lead to waste of time and money, over-ambitious or foolhardy goals lead to disappointment and or loss of life/limb.

We don't know the background of Rakesh, but from his posts it is clear that he is new to mountaineering, and unlikely to have climbed any 6000'ers. But seems confident in his opinion that there is nothing wrong in trying Nun/Kun, and looking to teaming up with others. If it was a person who was planning to run his first 5k this year and wants to run a marathon next year, people wouldn't react this sharply, because the max risk is inability to complete, or a rare heart attack. But to graduate from a 6000'er trekking peak (assuming he does it this year, by translating his boxing prowess to battling altitude and cold; note AMS cannot be overcome by mental toughness short of psychics) to a serious 7000'er in a remote area next year is quite something else. So, if I have to choose between someone's sentiments being hurt or someone's limbs being saved, choice is clear.

The more important point I wanted to make, which Rakesh was also alluding to was, it would be nice if people like JP who have worked their way up share with us a logical/reasonable progression of mountains, so that normal people can make reasonable goals (assuming most of us are not Ueli Stecks or Sherpas or national level athletes in other sports). Open it for public feedback, refine it over time, so we have a scale for Indian Himalayas (or do share if something exists, I may be unaware). Something like this to start: expedition.himalayanglacier.com/expedition-grade.html
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Re: Climbing Nun Kun Information Required 6 years, 6 months ago #965

Anyone can still climb a very hard, high mountain soon after a basic course; with sufficient sherpa support even legless, handless, and blind folks have summitted Everest. But barring those bravehearts, or those daredevils of yesteryears (yeah, many iconic mountains like Matterhorn, Eiger whose climbing attempts and fatalities made them famous, were climbed or attempted in near-suicidal foolhardy ways), the spirit of mountaineering in contemporary world is responsible, calculated risk and educated progress. Sans that, mountaineering will get a bad name, cause legal/bureaucratic problems for all future climbers, bad for the community.

For the record, I have not climbed any peak higher than 5000m anywhere in the world, so pardon me for voicing my opinion strongly :-)

Cheers and Bye
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Re: Climbing Nun Kun Information Required 6 years, 6 months ago #966

@ Admin: Thanks for guiding, keeping discussing in a direction where it will benefits all.
@ Loneranger :Thanks to you also dear for showing sentiments (aim of which is a safe climbing) and appriciate your concern as i need not to give any explanation about my past peak heights or other activities so i am not going to.

Enjoy...

Re: Climbing Nun Kun Information Required 6 years, 6 months ago #967

WOW!

I MEAN .. WOW!

@Loneranger - Thanks pal. I have never been defended like this. EVER.

I see from various posts on this forum that people like yourself, Sam, Trek_Tomato (after so many months that tomato name still amuses me) etc value my inputs and it humbles me. I only started as a casual visitor on this forum and am slowly beginning to realise that this has the potential to be our very own "summitpost". Other sites like India Mike are very generic and more travel oriented. This is quite the thing we need though.

Lonerangers post has actually inspired me to compose another big one before I retire to enjoy a much deserved break.

1. Stok Kangri! Easy. BUT the kind of person I am. I would train just as hard for the ascent. I NEVER take anything for granted. If anybody approached me for a good climb after their stint at one of the mountain schools, I would point them in the direction of Stok. Good height gain in relatively short span of time. Not very far from Leh, in case things go bad. So medical facilities are not too far. (trust me. this point is very relevant because I know of people (fit people) who have lost their lives on Stok).

2. If someone summits Stok and is elated and wants to share it with me. I will be all ears. All I do or have done is irrelevant. I was at IMF for a pre expedition briefing on 2 sep 13 and met with a legendary british climber (pardon me I am not good with names). His achievements are legendary and you know what was the most striking part of his personality? He was more interested in what my partner (Kevin) was doing or had done. Kevin told this guy about a possible ascent of Kili with his daughter (come Christmas) and this chap was all praises and only had encouraging words and at no time did he come across as a proud or arrogant person. The mountains have a tendency to do that to you.

Gyaan from a Stok summitter? Trust me loneranger; I have been given gyaan by lesser people. The best you can do is NOD and cleverly squirm away.

3. True. No real grading system on Indian Himalayas. But then even if you had one, my question would be - how reliable would that be? I was talking with Wg Cdr Sridharan (Ex IAF) who claims that till the 80's Kun was a walking peak until a whole face of the mountain was washed away. I mean if this man is correct and knowing him (he has no reason to lie or bluff), how would you plan an ascent based on grading system.

OK! the more recent Nun. It is graded AD+, but is that information alone useful. What that gives you is the technicality of the terrain. What it does not tell you is that September is a horrible month to climb, the camping (on snow and ice) will wear you out sooner than you think, the Nun Kun massif has its own micro climate and decide the weather in the region pretty much on their own. We had 6 days of non stop bad weather and on the 5th day I decided (call me a fool or call me brave - I will let you be my judge for a change. lol) to establish camp 2 in extreme bad weather. That is when all 4 of us suffered severe cold injuries. I had to send two of my friends to the BC when the weather cleared but Kevin and I continued to Camp 3 (summit camp) and beyond. (Kevin eventually also made it to the summit). What needs to be noticed is that the Indian Army, who were much better equipped to tackle the conditions decided to sit back and wait till the weather allowed them to climb higher. The team from Bombay was there too, but they were just an expendable bunch. Their presence was not useful at all. Point I am making is, grading has to be taken in context.

4. Lonerangers allusion to mountaineering and marathon is not only allegorical, but also relevant. Personally, I train really hard for ANY event. I DO NOT expect to get fit in the mountains. That is the best way to get yourself killed. The ideal way is to GET FIT before you set out on your adventure (according to me); which means you give yourself ample time to train. AND believe you me, NUN will require you to TRAIN hard. Of course, if you have porters carrying your stuff to BC and HAPs take it to Camp 1, then you dont really need to train. BUT I promise you one thing, you will be stuck at Camp 1 (or ABC) like those folks from Bombay simply because you are not conditioned to handle the situation. Running (Intensive and Extensive). calisthenics, weights training, swimming etc are fantastic exercises to train for an expedition and loneranger makes an important point about "running".

5. Lonerangers point about AMS and other altitude related conditions like Pulmonary and Cerebral Oedema cannot be emphasised more. I REITERATE his point, you CANNOT battle these conditions with mental toughness or physical fitness. You acclimatise well or you dont. If you dont acclimatise well, YOU DESCEND. Period. Your achievements in your previous sport are meant for the show case. Leave it behind when you go to the mountains (Himalayas in particular).

@Admin
6. I am certain I have had the utmost regard for the feelings of others (Rakesh included). But some points better be emphasised loud and clear. Even in that case, I believe I have been very reasonable, logical and methodical in my approach and careful in what I have said. But like ranger says, life and limb should be ones first choice.

7. MOST IMPORTANT POINT.
@Loneranger - Trust me, its not that easy. The admin had indicated the need for a Progress Chart kind of thing for Nun. It doesnt work like that. Not for me.
Simply because we are all different. Our bodies, minds, where we come from, how we think, how we react, how we train are all different.

Eg,
a) I train sincerely. But my partner hardly ever trained. I have to be brutally honest and say that he faired better than me on Nun. HOW DO I EXPLAIN THAT or put it in perspective? I cant. I have to be humble and admit that he is better. Dont get me wrong, I am good out there. JUST That Kevin is better. There is no shame in admitting the facts.

b) When we returned to the BC, I met with a doctor of Indian origin climbing with a British team (Led by Martin Moran). This guy had done a lot of 6000m + peaks and I mean a LOT. Even before reaching the BC, he had trekked to Kanji la and back for 3 days. So you would think he should have acclimatised well, right? Wrong. The guy had to return the following day to the road head because of AMS. One more point to be noted, he was actually surprised to the point of being shocked, when I told him how fast I ascend and establish high camps during an expedition; and this guy is a doctor.

c) A more relevant method would be to chalk out a long term (really long term) plan for oneself. So statements like I climb such and such peak this year and Nun next are fit for the trashcan. I am surprised you bring this up, since I remember posting the following snippet sometime earlier in response to one of Admins post. I paste it again.

Stok is a walking peak. Nun is not.
Stok can be done in 4 days Leh to Leh (by someone reasonably fit), but not Nun.
You dont really do an expedition to Stok. Its only a hike to the top. But on Nun, it takes effort just to get to the BC. All three higher camps on Nun are on Ice which changes things. You need supreme fitness in fighting against the terrain (Icefall, snow plateau, steep sections and the summit bid itself).
ITS NOT A MATTER OF HOW MANY 6000 or 7000m peaks one has done. Its more a matter of how well one is conditioned to tackle the challenges on Nun and more importantly how well one acclimatises on the mountain during the climb

So I dont know about the progression of mountains. Perhaps any mountain where apart from technical ice sections, you are camping on ice above 6000m for a few days. Climbing is one thing. Camping overnight on ice for a few days is quite another. The idea quite simply is this. After a long days work, your body should be able to recover in a few hours and be ready for another days work. If you are camping on ground then this process is easy. Ice makes it difficult because your sleep system has only so much insulation and an extremely chilly night has the tendency to GET TO YOU. Then you have to be prepared and conditioned to carry on, in case you have not had a good nights sleep and have not recovered well. Good HIGH sub 7000m objectives would be Chumser and Lungser in late august. This simulates the cold conditions although you will still be mostly camping on ground, its a useful experience. I can guarantee one thing (and I mean guarantee), Stok is not going to (in any way) prepare you for Nun. Like I said, Chumser, Lungser, KY1 (main summit), Mentok range (in september) etc are good objectives before even thinking of Nun. But this is a suggestion and not a norm or a guideline. You have to workout a sincere plan for yourself, which involves lot of training, conditioning and yes some mountaineering as well.

One more important thing. If you want to do this seriously, I mean seriously; please be willing to spend on apparel and equipment. I have been able to source (rented stuff) equipment and apparel for my friends during my expeditions, BUT I hardly ever rent stuff myself. I prefer my own gear and apparel during expeditions. This perhaps is the single most ignored aspect of mountaineering. The kind of apparel and clothing you wear on the mountains will tell me how serious or passionate you are about the sport. Your gear and apparel must be relevant to the mountain and you must keep your options open and must be willing to improvise and experiment with your gear. For example, I am a go light go fast person, but Kevin is "take it all to the BC" person (He actually brought a pillow to the BC this time. Ha ha.). We have different philosophies, but tend to work well together. And by gear I mean good stuff; which DOES NOT INCLUDE "Quechua". May be you can use Quechua for the hike to the BC, but nothing beyond that. If you are not able to source stuff or need help, please let me know. I MIGHT BE able to help. I am sure though that most people visiting here have contacts in the US and UK. So sourcing stuff should be easy. And then there is STP and REI too.

I think this is a pretty big essay. I hope the visitors dont doze off on this one.

Jerry
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Last Edit: 6 years, 6 months ago by jerrypothen.

Re: Climbing Nun Kun Information Required 6 years, 6 months ago #968

Heinrich Harrer didn't have even one peak more than 5000m before being taken in by the brits. He was a legend in his own right though. Lonerangers posts are sensible which is more important.

I understand this is a stage where decent people are willing to learn from and share experiences and knowledge with one another. So if one is living with past experiences or glories, Personally, I would tend to steer away from such.

Loneranger! you make yet another valid point about modern climbing. Safe, responsible and calculated risk. If there is going to be any madness, let there be method to it. eg I tried something this time apparel wise. Will share it in time.

Keep it coming though. Its not about how high you go. Its about how well you do it getting there.
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Re: Climbing Nun Kun Information Required 6 years, 6 months ago #970

fine thoughts Jerry... respect your balanced logistic traditional approach to mountains.

But thr is always a hidden push in our selves whr it push us to test.. i find myself of different school of thought here.. i am just talking of Kun after stok but if i share tht one of my partner has already enrolled for April 2014 Mt Everest summit (tht wud be oOOouccchh for others), anybody can say this is crazy thing.. But ground preparation of Fitness, Basic , Advance mountaineering course, MOI etc is already done and it wud help a little...

I dont knw hw many climbers thoughts like that but it is possible and no ritual of going through step by step altitude hike is must..

I will keep updated as it will surely leave a mark in memory this way or other..

Re: Climbing Nun Kun Information Required 6 years, 6 months ago #974

jerrypothen wrote:



3. True. No real grading system on Indian Himalayas. But then even if you had one, my question would be - how reliable would that be? I was talking with Wg Cdr Sridharan (Ex IAF) who claims that till the 80's Kun was a walking peak until a whole face of the mountain was washed away. I mean if this man is correct and knowing him (he has no reason to lie or bluff), how would you plan an ascent based on grading system.

OK! the more recent Nun. It is graded AD+, but is that information alone useful. What that gives you is the technicality of the terrain. What it does not tell you is that September is a horrible month to climb, the camping (on snow and ice) will wear you out sooner than you think, the Nun Kun massif has its own micro climate and decide the weather in the region pretty much on their own. .

I think this is a pretty big essay. I hope the visitors dont doze off on this one.



This is all already taken care of by the alpine grade. If they say it is AD+, it refers to the overall difficulty under IDEAL conditions; guidebook times are for a fit, already acclimatised party of two (as in alpine style; I guess you will have larger parties in mountaineering). Remoteness, cold, exposure, protectability, are all factored in. The crux move in, Auguille du Midi is grade IV, about 15 feet of rock, but it is well-protected, a short nice climb close to the cable car station, so overall grade of the climb is AD-. Whereas the Biancograt route on Piz Bernina, the maximum hardness of move is grade III rock, but sustained mixed ground; cumulative ascent is about 1500m and takes 7 hours guidebook times, and is rated AD+. Basically what it means is you need bigger balls to do Biancograt than the Midi tour.

Now if you do the Midi in winter conditions, it would be D or something.

That is how you use alpine grades. I understand the environmental factors are far more complex in the himalayas (as you nicely brought out), that is why i said in my earlier post that the way some people apply alpine grade to Himalayan mountains is a bit sketchy, because they only refer to the technical difficulty (e.g. one axe vs two tools, or rock grade).

As for progression, again because of my background in running and rock-climbing before getting into alpinism, I am a fan of gradual logical progress. I understand it would be more iffy in Himalayas.

Now coming to Mt Everest, I was under the impression that you can no longer climb Everest? Ueli Steck and team tried it this year but were shouted out by the sherpas. Current norms are, the Sherpas rig up the mountain with fixed ropes and ladders and clients jumar up the mountain. That is the ONLY way you can get to the top. Most people also use HAPs to carry their O2 and group gear, that is how legless people and teenagers get to the top; I know it is still an arduous task, and especially risky for rookies who end up their). If that can be considered climbing or conquering the mountain, well then, so be it.

To me, coming from some alpine background, you have to actually CLIMB every inch of the mountain, lead it if you can, or at least climb as follower. If you want to jumar up the technical sections, missing out the joy of actual climbing, feeling the exquisite texture of the route, why bother going to the mountain? To pose for pictures at the top?
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Last Edit: 6 years, 6 months ago by Loneranger. Reason: spelling

Re: Climbing Nun Kun Information Required 6 years, 6 months ago #975

Hi Guys ,

Deleting Posts which are not contributing to the forum or Mountaineering community directly .

We have a personal message (PM) section where these things can be taken forward .

Hope to get more informative posts relevant to the topic .
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Re: Climbing Nun Kun Information Required 6 years, 6 months ago #976

Yes mostly larger parties during a Himalayan expedition. But its interesting you should say that remoteness, cold, exposure etc are factored in. I still think the grading system works fine for the Alps (never actually climbed there, but my opinion is based on people who have climbed there and struggled in the Himalayas. There is also a bunch who are at ease both in the Alps and the Himalayas). To say Nun and Kun are AD+ and leave it at that would be a gross understatement. I know of people who have done grades tougher than that in the Alps and South America and then suffer on mountains like Kun or Satopanth (both graded AD or AD+).

I think we agree on this. Applying alpine grades to Himalayas is definitely sketchy. I would put it this way. Do a lot of research in selecting an objective. Do your homework on the skills involved in tackling the mountain. Train really hard and hopefully one will have a good trip.

Actually, absolutely not. Gradual, logical progress is the way to go. Deliberation is a good thing. You cannot dictate terms to the mountain as some people believe. The mountains were there before you and I were born. And guess what? They'll be there long after you and I are gone. So a stacked, steady approach is a good thing; with a big effort saved within for when the situation demands.

It was possible to get the permits and climb individually on Everest. But yes that ugly altercation did it. Its a shame and hard to judge who is to blame. I have a tendency to side with the sherpas. But the Europeans sound justified in their narration of the events as well. So I guess we'll never know. Personally, for me, my Everest is K2. If I had that kind of money, I would aim and train for K2. But I will disappoint you there loneranger. Because if I am spending that kind of money (and believe me thats a lot of money), I will go for a guided trip because I just dont have the financial means to do it again (and again for that matter); so I better to do it right the first time. Either that, or I tell me mom to find me a rich girl for a wife. Of course, things are a lot more complicated than that. There is weather and then there is the stupid visa issue which I am most likely going to be denied.

Agreed with you about the spirit of Alpinism. One must climb every inch of the mountain in order to make claims of having conquered the mountain. But is that always possible?

Lets take for example ski descents. A purist would say that one must ski down the whole mountain in order to claim a ski descent. BUT is that always possible? You know the answer. I tend to be flexible in these matters. If its possible to CLIMB, then WE climb. If its risky for even one member of the team, then fixed lines are a boon as far as safety is concerned. Its a good mix of alpinism and expedition styles, that we employ.
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Re: Climbing Nun Kun Information Required 6 years, 6 months ago #980

An afterthought ..

Bear in mind, if I or a Sherpa has to fix a line for a member/s of the team, we are still climbing the section at least once in order to do that.
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Re: Climbing Nun Kun Information Required 6 years, 6 months ago #983

jerrypothen wrote:
To say Nun and Kun are AD+ and leave it at that would be a gross understatement. I know of people who have done grades tougher than that in the Alps and South America and then suffer on mountains like Kun or Satopanth (both graded AD or AD+).

I think we agree on this. ...

Agreed with you about the spirit of Alpinism. One must climb every inch of the mountain in order to make claims of having conquered the mountain. But is that always possible?

Lets take for example ski descents. A purist would say that one must ski down the whole mountain in order to claim a ski descent. BUT is that always possible? You know the answer. I tend to be flexible in these matters. If its possible to CLIMB, then WE climb. If its risky for even one member of the team, then fixed lines are a boon as far as safety is concerned. Its a good mix of alpinism and expedition styles, that we employ.


Yes, that's exactly what I am saying, as I am one of them too :) done technically much harder routes (up to D+ in the Alps), and struggled at altitude during a exploratory hikes in Ladakh. Likewise, I would guess, there would be people who have climbed well in Himalayas but can't translate that to steep ice faces or mixed ground elsewhere in the world. The very reason why we need some form of grading specifically for Himalayas. Alpine grade is for alpine ascents, single push light & fast ascents from hut-to-hut in a day (typically) and definitely does not factor setting up camp and sleeping on ice.

I never meant to say one should never pull on fixed gear, or alpinism is superior to other forms or one should completely shun sherpas or O2 (sorry it came across that way, didn't realize while writing). If and when I climb high in Himalayas (that will be after I do some of the mountaineering courses here, so I that appreciate the nuances of Himalayan climbing and ethos first, I don't want to rely too much on my mental toughness) I too will hire a guide/sherpa.

And in the Everest episode I too don't have a position on who was right, the sherpas or the Europeans.

I was merely explaining the puzzle of why it took 50 years or 100 years for Mt Everest to be climbed the first time by the world's best, but today it is possible for someone who's never climbed before to aim to summit Everest in 2-3 years.
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Re: Climbing Nun Kun Information Required 6 years, 6 months ago #984

Loneranger wrote:

Yes, that's exactly what I am saying, as I am one of them too :) done technically much harder routes (up to D+ in the Alps), and struggled at altitude during a exploratory hikes in Ladakh. Likewise, I would guess, there would be people who have climbed well in Himalayas but can't translate that to steep ice faces or mixed ground elsewhere in the world. The very reason why we need some form of grading specifically for Himalayas. Alpine grade is for alpine ascents, single push light & fast ascents from hut-to-hut in a day (typically) and definitely does not factor setting up camp and sleeping on ice.

I never meant to say one should never pull on fixed gear, or alpinism is superior to other forms or one should completely shun sherpas or O2 (sorry it came across that way, didn't realize while writing). If and when I climb high in Himalayas (that will be after I do some of the mountaineering courses here, so I that appreciate the nuances of Himalayan climbing and ethos first, I don't want to rely too much on my mental toughness) I too will hire a guide/sherpa.


You never said it Loneranger. But thats a fact. Let me say it. Alpinism IS A SUPERIOR form of mountaineering where the climber ought be self sufficient. I have tried it on lesser peaks like Mentok 1 and 2 and to an extent on KY1. But beyond that would be pushing it. Expedition style is apt for the Himalayas. Personally, Sherpa is a member of the team for me; and he is not there to drag me to the top, he is there so that him and I can help each other get to the top; if possible (weather permitting). (Actually its him helping me more than me helping him .. LOL; but you know what I mean). But other things remain. I carry my stuff, I ferry my load (or share equally the load) while establishing high camps and definitely "NO O2" for me. I have never used O2 but am constantly in touch with members of military expeditions who have been on Everest, Makalu etc and have used O2. They say it makes a big difference. You are at 8000+m and feel at 6500 or 7000m. Thats a big thing on the mountains. To put it in perspective for this topic (I see the admin fuming over the relevance of all this); Nun or Kun; alpine style? Difficult but doable. One would have to be really good. Would I try? Not sure!!

Loneranger wrote:

And in the Everest episode I too don't have a position on who was right, the sherpas or the Europeans.


Knowing Sherpas and meeting with some of them so often. I have learnt one thing about them, they are very emotional, humble people. I will leave it at that. :)

Loneranger wrote:

I was merely explaining the puzzle of why it took 50 years or 100 years for Mt Everest to be climbed the first time by the world's best, but today it is possible for someone who's never climbed before to aim to summit Everest in 2-3 years.

True. Not only can you desire to climb Everest these days. You are actually guaranteed to reach the top if you have USD 25000 + ; weather permitting.
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Last Edit: 6 years, 6 months ago by jerrypothen.

Re: Climbing Nun Kun Information Required 6 years, 6 months ago #985

Wow . . . !

I've been travelling for a bit but didn't expect to miss the bus completely with respect to this forum . . . Incredible, when you've got more email updates from Indian Mountaineers than from office, you definitely know that the discussion / debate was worth it . 'Jerry- My man', Welcome back . . . and Dude . . . what a welcome . . . Hahahaa . . .

Re: Climbing Nun Kun Information Required 6 years, 6 months ago #986

But on a Serious Note . . . !

My small meager contributions to an interesting topic, that certainly deserves its own title / thread . . . "Commercial Expeditions vs. Alpine Expeditions "

I am one of those Prudent as opposed to Passionate mountain indulgers ( again as opposed to mountain climbers) . However, I do have a friend called Shashank ( again from Chennai) who did the Basic Course with from WHMI, Manali in 2011. Yes, yes . . . i know all you studs from NIM and HMI Darjeeling are softly chuckling in disdain on this . . . but then again, "Not the point I'm making"

Shashank belongs to the latter category. Extremely passionate. Soon after our course he, along with some more experienced guys attempted Hanuman Tibba in the Phir Panjal Range above Solang Nala; Alpine style. Though not successful, a tremendous learning experience. After several other mountains, last year, an attempt on Satopan, and then this year an attempt on Kamet

Though success has eluded him, I have no illusions about the debt of knowledge he has attained by virtue of these experiences. As far as the debate on whether an Everest Summit actually qualifies an individual on being a mountaineer or not, I do look on with deep regret .

The over simplified picture painted by the press pertaining to the quest of Everest has belittled a commendable conquest, thus robbing serious climber from even aspiring to achieve the summit. More so, it has encouraged many people who should never be any where near a mountain to at least try. Recent tragedies on Everest are testimony to that. Interestingly, last year there were more deaths on Everest during the 2012 climbing season than any of those must read legendary books of "Into thin Air", "Dark Summit" etc. We were there, and it was bad. Hard hitting facts are difficult to deal with and often not reported.

Thanks chief, for sharing your account on this thread. Would really recommend that if you can put down your expedition experience into an article, would make for some really good reading on the article section.

Cheers

Re: Climbing Nun Kun Information Required 6 years, 6 months ago #989

Good to be back Sam. Where were you? I almost got mauled by Apollo Creed with only Loneranger on my side of the ring. LOL

Sam, its the highest mountain in the world. That is never going to change. So if one has been there, then he has been there. Commendable. BUT!! If a man gets to moon, is he an astraunaut? You know the answer. That said! Who are you and I to take away something from someone. But thats not the point. Let me put it as another question. Which is easier to climb. Everest at just under 9000m or Ama Dablam, at just under 7000m. Again you know the answer. Most people will not do Ama Dablam even as a Pre Everest expedition because of the sheer difficulty.

Coming back to Nun-Kun. I blog at "randomadventurez.blogspot.in" so the account will be there, but not too soon. I cant feel my feet and fingers yet. :D
In a month I should have something there though. My priority at the moment is to recover in time for the skiing season. ha ha.
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Last Edit: 6 years, 6 months ago by jerrypothen.

Re: Climbing Nun Kun Information Required 6 years, 6 months ago #990

Haha . . .Stallone, would be proud with your Analogy. Lol . . . From Rocky to Cliffhanger . Thanks for the reference to randomadventurez.blogspot.in. Will definitely check it out. As far as the lack of sensation wrt the fingers, all the typing you've been doing must have definitely got the circulation going.

On a separate note, do let us know your climbing plans for 2014. Would really like to sign up. Provided if you deemed fit, for us lower mammals ( on the climbing chain, if not the food chain ) . Congratulations once again, more on getting your entire team back safe, than more on attaining the summit.

Cheers,
Sam

Re: Climbing Nun Kun Information Required 6 years, 6 months ago #991

The thing I like about Stallones part in Rocky is that he is humble and very planted. One of my favourite movies. (Rocky V spoils the franchise a bit)

I type with 8 fingers usually; 4 feels weird. :) not to mention slow.

Sure Sam. I was thinking of Sasser, Satopanth and/or Nun again (or may be Kun). But that's some time away. Winters fast approaching, and its time to pull the skis out of the rack. ;) Of all the mountain sports, skiing is what is most exciting (to me) and gives ME joy. Wish me well. LOL

And before the admin pokes me about the relevance of this post; if you are with a team, safety comes first and foremost. Since Rakesh is attempting Kun, its worthwhile to mention that Kun is slightly tougher than Nun.
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