" One does not climb to attain enlightenment, rather one climbs because he is enlightened." -Zen Master Futomaki.
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TOPIC: Venturing out or getting stuck in bad weather or storm

Venturing out or getting stuck in bad weather or storm 6 years, 9 months ago #707

Is it a good idea to venture out in storm or bad weather just to get an experience? Or what if someone encounters bad weather?
  • maddy
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Re: Venturing out or getting stuck in bad weather or storm 6 years, 9 months ago #708

As is said by a couple of mountaineering stalwarts, be adventurous, but avoid being in a situation where you are completely at the mercy of lady luck. In either of these situations here are a few things to be considered –
  • While evaluating the route or the objective, what type of climb it is – is it snow, ice or rock? Because if it is an ice or snow route, some more from the heavens will not have a huge impact on the climb. On the contrary, a rock route will be a problem in stormy weather. Then again, the type of rock matters. For instance, the seasoned campaigners say that limestone is less slippery when wet, as compared to other rocks. However, all rock routes get exponentially harder when exposed to new snow..
  • Another factor is what kind of route is it. Routes that keep you going at a decent pace as much a possible are preferred as you could be vulnerable of exposure to precipitation and get wet. So being dr and warm is the top priority. Amongst these two also, being dry has to be your ultimate goal, even before being warm. As being dry will automatically help stay warm.
  • sheereeb
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Re: Venturing out or getting stuck in bad weather or storm 6 years, 9 months ago #711

What sheereeb has said is absolutely right. Also, from what I have read, experts also say -
  • Think about how are you going to find your way up in a stormy and cloudy weather. You can dare to venture out in storm or nasty weather only if you are sure of the route in your mind and have great memory, observation skills and your understanding and reading of the distinctiveness of the terrain. Unfortunately open snow fields or snow covered glaciers with a few crevasses provide few features to remember.
  • Another aspect is trails and tracks – as a result of blowing snow, tracks can be obscured. Take a call as to how much would you be relying on tracks and then keep track of wind and snowfall intensity. Time your descent in a way that you can get help of a trail created by you previously or by others.
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